First Ebola Patient Diagnosed on American Soil Dies

His illness and death leaves a lasting impact on his family and community in Dallas, Texas

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First Ebola Patient Diagnosed on American Soil Dies

The first Ebola patient diagnosed on American soil dies Wednesday

The first Ebola patient diagnosed on American soil dies Wednesday

wptv.com

The first Ebola patient diagnosed on American soil dies Wednesday

wptv.com

wptv.com

The first Ebola patient diagnosed on American soil dies Wednesday

Isabel Molina, Writing Editor

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Thomas Eric Duncan, the first Ebola patient diagnosed on American soil, died Wednesday, October 8.  Duncan was not only the first Ebola patient diagnosed in America as opposed to diagnosed in Africa and transported here, but the first to die on American soil as well.

Duncan returned from Liberia to his home in Dallas, Texas, and started showing symptoms on September 20.  He originally went to the hospital on September 25 with a fever and stomach pain but was turned away.

When he was finally diagnosed, the experimental drug used to treat the virus Zmapp was unavailable.  He passed away 10 days after his admission to a hospital in Dallas.  State health officials say that he will be cremated.

Officials quarantined Duncan’s apartment.  A patient who came into contact with Duncan is now displaying Ebola-like symptoms and results are expected back soon.  This patient is currently hospitalized even though he only displays a select few of the symptoms.

Some symptoms of Ebola are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea (possibly bloody), red eyes, rash, chest pain and cough, stomach pain, and bleeding from the eyes or other orifices.  Ebola can be transmitted through bodily fluids, contaminated needles or syringes, or infected animals.  The virus is not airborne.

Travelers from West Africa are being screened at airports for fevers and are asked about any possible symptoms.

Since the beginning of the outbreak five months ago, there have been 8,000 confirmed cases of Ebola and almost half died from the virus.

‘Patient Zero’ is suspected to be a two year old from a town in Guinea.  Researchers believe it can be traced even farther back to fruit bats.

 

 

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